Emma Kate & Co.

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Sunday, 29 January 2017

Books I Read in January

I somehow read/listened to 8 books this month, which I'm pretty pleased with considering my goal for the year is to read 50. As you can probably see, there’s a massive range in what I’ve read; long to short, fiction to non-fiction and new to very very old.  I’m an English literature student so much of my reading this month has been for my degree (hence the Beowulf) but I also still read a lot for pleasure. I've got a long old walk to and from university everyday so I’ve also listened to quite a few audiobooks.



1. INSIDE VOGUE: A DIARY OF MY 100TH YEAR by Alexandra Shulman
This book is pretty self-explanatory. Editor-in-chief of British Vogue, Alexandra Shulman, writes a diary of the magazine’s centenary year. I loved this book so much. It gave a real insight into the fashion world and you get a real feel for Shulman’s voice and personality. If you love Vogue or fashion culture then I imagine you’ll really enjoy this book.

2. CTRL, ALT; DELETE: HOW I GREW UP ONLINE by Emma Gannon
I picked this up after listening to Emma’s podcast for a while. I knew that she’d written a book but it hadn’t really appealed to me. Whilst I absolutely love Emma, the thing I loved most about her podcast was all the different people she spoke to on it. I decided to give it a go anyway and I really enjoyed it. Emma speaks about the Internet and her personal experience of it. She is very candid and often shares things that others would be too embarrassed of. There were so many moments when reading it I’d find myself laughing or nodding my head in agreement. If you remember the days of MSN chat, I think you’ll enjoy this funny walk down memory lane.

3. YOU AE A BADASS: HOW TO STOP DOUBTING YOUR GREATNESS AND START LIVING AN AWESOME LIFE by Jen Sincero
I should have known this wasn’t going to be my cup of tea when I read the title. I saw it on my recommended books on Audible though and couldn’t think of anything else I felt like reading at the time so I gave it a go. Sincero basically talks about the power of attraction and provides a lot of clich├ęd anecdotes about following your dreams. This really just wasn’t for me.

4. MAGPIE MURDERS by Anthony Horowitz
I haven’t read anything by Anthony Horowitz since I was eleven reading the Alex Rider series. Anyway, seeing his name reminded me of how I engrossed I’d get in his books when I was younger and I wondered if his adult fiction would have the same effect. This book is long but easy to read and enjoyable. As the title suggests it follows a murder mystery. The plot is very different however in that it follows a book inside a book structure. It was exciting and compelling.

5. BEOWULF translation by Seamus Heaney
Beowulf is thought to be written between the 8th and early 11th century so when I found out I’d have to read it for one of my modules this term I was less than impressed. However, it’s actually quite enjoyable – all about kings and dragons. It’s very short and Heaney’s translation is incredibly beautiful.

6. HAMLET by William Shakespeare
I don’t really know what I can say about Hamlet that hasn’t already been said. It’s Shakespeare. It’s good. I’ve never studied it before so it was all quite new to me and, now that I’ve read it, I’d love to see it performed.

7. SO YOU’VE BEEN PUBLICLY SHAMED by Jon Ronson
I have heard so many people talk about this and I think the premise is really interesting. Ronson talks to people who have been publicly shamed on social media e.g. people who made a bad joke or a mistake at work and have suffered for it as a result. It was really interesting to think about how we treat each other online and the real life consequences are social media actions can have.

8. IN OUR TIME by Ernest Hemingway

In Our Time is a collection of short stories by Hemingway and as such is probably a good place to start if you’ve never read him before. I know a lot of people don’t like his style of writing because it’s very sparse and a bit soulless. I can see where they’re coming from. That being said I still enjoyed it although I’m not sure this would be the case if I read one of his novels.

9. MILK AND HONEY by Rupi Kaur
My flatmate kindly lent this to me and I'm so glad she did. Milk and Honey is collection of poetry about love, abuse, loss and femininity. Her writing is very beautiful and I can imagine strikes a cord with many women. I think it's incredible that she self-published this book and it's amazing to see how successful it's been.



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4 comments

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. I've just looked it up and it looks like such a good book, I definitely need to put it on my to read list! xx

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  2. What a great post! I've been dying to expand what I read recently, but I always find reviews on Amazon etc so divisive, that I tend to just revert to my old favourites. I'd definitely like to check out Milk & Honey, and 'So You've Been Publicly Shamed' sounds fascinating!

    Kate x

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    1. I know what you mean. Sometimes I'm really excited about a book and then I read reviews and think hmm, maybe not! xx

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